Charioteer of Delphi

Item #05965

Description:
An exceptional bronze replica of the ancient Greek masterpiece, the Delphi Charioteer, a standing chariot driver, reins in hand, wearing the traditional charioteer’s costume called a xystis, and characteristic amber eyes, the original work dating to ca. 474 BC, the replica likely of Greek production, ca. 1950.   70 ins. high, 20.5 ins. wide, 27.5 ins. deep.

The original work, also known as “Heniokhos”, was created to commemorate a chariot team victory at Delphi’s Pythian Games, held in honor of Pythian Apollo, the patron god of Delphi.  The figure, part of a larger sculptural group that included horses, groomsmen, and chariot (very little of which survives), was executed in the Severe style (a period of ancient Greek art falling between the Archaic and the Early Classical periods).  The original work resides at the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

Provenance: Ex-collection Felix de Weldon (1907-2003), the celebrated Austrian-born American sculptor known particularly for his monuments (having produced at least one for every continent on the globe), and most famous for the Iwo Jima memorial (1954).  This statue was displayed in the gardens at Beacon Rock, a McKim, Mead, & White designed estate in Newport, Rhode Island, owned by the sculptor from 1951 to 1996.

  • Charioteer of Delphi
  • Charioteer of Delphil
  • Charioteer of Delphi
  • Charioteer of Delphi
  • Charioteer of Delphi